Sunday, November 16, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: WOW...my book cover semi-finalist

Linda's Write Spot: WOW...my book cover semi-finalist: @LindaKBlack Congratulations semi-finalist #covercontest AUTHORSDB #1ADB #details ... http://t.co/KYsgrpomc2 — AUTHORSdB (@AUTHORSdB) N...

WOW...my book cover semi-finalist






Thursday, November 6, 2014

Book Signing

JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS!!












SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6 9:00AM - 12:00 NOON
Home Plate Cafe
5110 HWY 7 N
Hot Springs Village, Arkansas

Friday, October 3, 2014

A Legend Among Us

http://www.amazon.com/Legend-Among-Us-Youngblood-Baseball/dp/1502784254/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1413474815&sr=1-1&keywords=a+legend+among+us
Product Details

Now Available!!!

This book tells the compelling story of a seventeen year old young man who entered the Negro Baseball League, before graduating high school, with great aspirations of playing in the Major League. Nicknamed "Youngblood" by Satchel Paige, William McCrary is a legend in himself and one of the few remaining figures of the acclaimed Negro Baseball League.

Friday, September 26, 2014

NMAAHC -- National Museum of African American History and Culture
Lonnie Bunch, museum director, historian, lecturer, and author, is proud to present A Page from Our American Story, a regular on-line series for Museum supporters. It will showcase individuals and events in the African American experience, placing these stories in the context of a larger story — our American story.
A Page From Our American Story
At the dawn of the Automobile Age in the early 20th century, hundreds of small auto companies sprouted up across America as entrepreneurs recognized that society was transitioning from horse-drawn carriages to transportation powered by the internal combustion engine. Some of these early companies grew to become giants that are still with us today, such as Ford and Chevrolet. Many others remained small, struggling to compete against the assembly lines of the larger manufacturers.

One such company was C.R. Patterson & Sons of Greenfield, Ohio, makers of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile from 1915 to 1918. Though its name is little recognized today, there is in fact a very important reason to ensure that it is not lost to history: it was, and remains to this day, the only African American owned and operated automobile company.
Frederick Patterson with a prototype of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile.

Charles Richard Patterson was born into slavery on a Virginia plantation in 1833. Not much is known about his life on the plantation, and historians have to sift through conflicting reports about how he came to settle in Greenfield, Ohio, a town with strong abolitionist sympathies. Some say his family arrived in the 1840s, possibly after purchasing their freedom; others suggest Patterson alone escaped in 1861. In any case, he learned the skills of the blacksmith and found work in the carriage-making trade, where he developed a reputation for building a high quality product. In 1873, he formed a business partnership with another carriage maker in town, J.P. Lowe, who was white, and eventually became sole proprietor of the renamed C.R. Patterson & Sons in 1893. It was a successful business employing an integrated workforce of 35-50 by the turn of the century, and Charles Patterson became a prominent and respected citizen in Greenfield. His catalog listed some 28 models, from simple open buggies to larger and more expensive closed carriages for doctors and other professionals.

When Patterson died in 1910, the business passed to his son Frederick, who was already something of a pioneer. He was college-educated and was the first black athlete to play football for Ohio State University. He was also an early member and vice president of the National Negro Business League founded by Booker T. Washington. Now, as owner and operator of the enterprise his father started, Frederick Patterson began to see the handwriting on the wall: the days of carriages and horse-drawn buggies were nearing an end.
Early advertisement for the Patterson-Greenfield automobile.At first, the company offered repair and restoration services for the “horseless carriages” that were beginning to proliferate on the streets of Greenfield. No doubt this gave workers the opportunity to gain some hands-on knowledge about these noisy, smoky and often unreliable contraptions. Like his father, Frederick was a strong believer in advertising and placed his first ad for auto repair services in the local paper in 1913. Initially, the work mostly involved repainting bodies and reupholstering interiors, but as the shop gained more experience with engines and drivetrains, they began to offer sophisticated upgrades and improvements to electrical and mechanical systems as well.

This valuable experience allowed C.R. Patterson & Sons to take the next great step in its own story as well as in African American history: in 1915, it announced the availability of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile at a price of $685. From the company's publicity efforts, it is evident they were bursting with pride:

“Our car is made with three distinct purposes in mind. First — It is not intended for a large car. It is designed to take the place originally held by the family surrey. It is a 5-passenger vehicle, ample and luxurious. Second — It is intended to meet the requirements of that class of users, who, though perfectly able to spend twice the amount, yet feel that a machine should not engross a disproportionate share of expenditure, and especially it should not do so to the exclusion of proper provisions for home and home comfort, and the travel of varied other pleasurable and beneficial entertainment. It is a sensibly priced car. Third — It is intended to carry with it (and it does so to perfection) every conceivable convenience and every luxury known to car manufacture. There is absolutely nothing shoddy about it. Nothing skimp and stingy.”
A child leans out of a 1917 Patterson-Greenfield roadster.Orders began to come in, and C.R. Patterson & Sons officially entered the ranks of American auto manufacturers. Over the years, several models of coupes and sedans were offered, including a stylish “Red Devil” speedster. Ads featured the car's 30hp Continental 4-cylinder engine, full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting, and a split windshield for ventilation. The build quality of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile was as highly regarded as it had been with their carriages.

The initial hope and optimism, however, proved to be fairly short-lived. In an age of increased mechanization and production lines, small independent shops featuring hand-built, high quality products weren't able to scale up production or compete on price against the rapidly growing car companies out of Detroit. In small quantities, parts and supplies were expensive and hard to come by when major manufacturers were buying them by the trainload at greatly reduced costs. Plus, the labor hours per car were much higher than that of assembly line manufacturers. As a result, the profit margin on each Patterson-Greenfield was low.
A Patterson-Greenfield bus printed with the words 'Greenfield School District'.In 1918, having built by some estimates between 30 and 150 vehicles, C.R. Patterson & Sons halted auto production and concentrated once again on the repair side of the business. But they weren't done yet. In the 1920s, the company began building truck and bus bodies to be fitted on chassis made by other manufacturers. It was in a sense a return to their original skills in building carriage bodies without engines and drivetrains and, for a period of time, the company was quite profitable. Then in 1929, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression set in. As with many small businesses, sales dried up and loans were hard to obtain. The company, now run by the sons of Frederick Patterson, soldiered on until 1939 when, after 74 years, C.R. Patterson & Sons closed its doors forever.

Sadly, no Patterson-Greenfield automobiles are known to survive today. But we should not let that dim the fact that two great entrepreneurs, Charles Richard Patterson and his son Frederick Patterson built and sustained a business that lasted several generations and earned a place not just in African American history, but in automotive history as well.
 Portrait of Lonnie BunchAll the best,
Signed by Lonnie Bunch
Lonnie Bunch
Director

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the newest member of the Smithsonian Institution's family of extraordinary museums. The museum will be far more than a collection of objects. The Museum will be a powerful, positive force in the national discussion about race and the important role African Americans have played in the American story — a museum that will make all Americans proud.

 
            

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

A Legend Among Us

Coming soon to a bookstore near you, and if you enjoyed the clip please comment and share. Thanks for the support!


Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Black History...

Linda's Write Spot: Black History...: Fact #22 Female science fiction author Octavia Butler was dyslexic. Despite her disorder, she went on to win Hugo and Nebula awar...

Black History...

Fact #22
  • Octavia Butler
Female science fiction author Octavia Butler was dyslexic. Despite her disorder, she went on to win Hugo and Nebula awards for her writing, as well as a "genius" grant from the MacArthur Foundation.

Linda's Write Spot: Many of our mothers and fathers inspired us to rea...

Linda's Write Spot: Many of our mothers and fathers inspired us to rea...: Fact #23 When African-American neurosurgeon Ben Carson was a child, his mother required him to read two library books a week and giv...

Many of our mothers and fathers inspired us to read and write even though they were illiterate

Fact #23
When African-American neurosurgeon Ben Carson was a child, his mother required him to read two library books a week and give her written reports, even though she was barely literate. She would then take the papers and pretend to carefully review them, placing a checkmark at the top of the page to show her approval. The assignments inspired Carson's eventual love of reading and learning.

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Hot Springs Sentinel Record--February 22, 2014

New book for young children explains death in unconventional way



    Author Linda Pennington Black, of Hot Springs Village, has penned a new book to help adults explain death to young children.
    In “My Daddy is a Star,” a mother incorporates nature into her explanation of death to her young daughter, who can’t understand why her father was taken away.
    Zaliyah, a young girl, struggles to understand why her dad was taken from her so soon and so suddenly and turns to her mother for answers and consolation.
    Not knowing exactly how to explain death to a 6-yearold, her mother tells Zaliyah a story her mom once told her about the stars and angels to somehow make her understand about her dad. This unorthodox approach to an explanation is tailored for the young and seasoned.
    The author’s greatest passion and inspiration is writing for children. She is an award-winning poet and author of “The Adventures of Boots: The Giant Snowball,” an award-winner, “A Porpoise for Cara,” and “S.T.O.P. Bullying.”

Monday, February 17, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Another piece of Black History

Linda's Write Spot: Another piece of Black History: In 1919, Alice Parker of Morristown, New Jersey, invented a new and improved gas heating furnace that provided central heating. You can view...

Another piece of Black History

In 1919, Alice Parker of Morristown, New Jersey, invented a new and improved gas heating furnace that provided central heating. You can view Alice Parker's patent below.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Did you know?

Linda's Write Spot: Did you know?: Thomas Jennings was the first African American to receive a patent, on March 3, 1821 (U.S. patent3306x). Thomas Jennings' patent was for...

Did you know?

Thomas Jennings was the first African American to receive a patent, on March 3, 1821 (U.S. patent3306x). Thomas Jennings' patent was for a dry-cleaning process called "dry scouring". The first money Thomas Jennings earned from his patent was spent on the legal fees (my polite way of saying enough money to purchase) necessary to liberate his family out of slavery and support the abolitionist cause.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Day 7 more Black History facts

Linda's Write Spot: Day 7 more Black History facts: George Carruthers helmed the group of scientists that created the far ultraviolet camera/spectrograph, used in the 1972 Apollo 16 flight ...

Day 7 more Black History facts


George Carruthers helmed the group of scientists that created the far ultraviolet camera/spectrograph, used in the 1972 Apollo 16 flight to the moon. His invention revealed new features in Earth's far-outer atmosphere and highlighted a variety of celestial objects from the perspective of the lunar surface. Carruthers was inducted into the National Inventor's Hall of Fame in 2003.

Bessie Coleman (1892 -1926)
Bessie Coleman one of 13 children born to a Native American father and an African American mother. They lived in Texas and faced the kinds of difficulties many Black Americans faced at the time, including segregation and disenfranchisement. Bessie worked hard in her childhood, picking cotton and helping her mother with the laundry she took in. But Bessie didn't let any of it stop her. She educated herself and managed to graduate from high school. After seeing some newsreels on aviation, Bessie became interested in becoming a pilot, but no U.S flight schools would accept her because she was Black and because she was female. Undeterred, she saved enough money to go to France where she heard women could be pilots. In 1921, she became the first Black woman in the world to earn a pilot's license.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Day 6

Linda's Write Spot: Day 6: I missed yesterday so I'm doubling up. Power outages everywhere. The banjo originated in Africa and up until the 1800s was considered...

Day 6

I missed yesterday so I'm doubling up. Power outages everywhere.

The banjo originated in Africa and up until the 1800s was considered an instrument only played by blacks.

 Jack Johnson (1878 – 1946), the first African–American heavyweight champion, patented a wrench in 1922.

 Engineer David Crosthwait, Jr. held 39 U.S. patents and 80 international patents pertaining to heating, refrigeration, temperature regulation and pump processes.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: Day 4 Black history

Linda's Write Spot: Day 4 Black history: Otis Boykin  invented electronic control devices for guided missiles, IBM computers and pacemakers. He would receive almost a dozen patent...

Day 4 Black history


Otis Boykin invented electronic control devices for guided missiles, IBM computers and pacemakers. He would receive almost a dozen patents over his lifetime.


  1. Matthew Alexander Henson (1866-1955)
    Henson was the son of free-born tenant farmers, but his early life was difficult. He started his life as an explorer at the age of eleven when he ran away from an abusive home. In 1891, Henson went with Robert Peary on the first of several trips to Greenland. Peary was determined to find the geographic North Pole. In 1909, Peary and Henson went on what was to be their final trip, the one on which they reached the North Pole. Henson was actually the first to set foot on the North Pole, but when the two returned home, it was Peary who received all the credit. Because he was Black, Henson was virtually ignored.

Monday, February 3, 2014

Day 3


Henry Blair is believed to be the second African American to receive a patent. He invented a corn seed planter in 1834 and a cotton planter in 1836. Because he could not read or write, Blair signed his patent with an "X."

Jean Baptiste Point du Sable (1745?-1818)
  1. DuSable was a Black man from Haiti is who is credited with founding Chicago. His father was a Frenchman in Haiti and his mother was an African slave. It's not clear how he arrived in New Orleans from Haiti, but once he did, he traveled from there to what is now modern day Peoria, Illinois. Although he was not the first to pass through the area, he was the first to establish a permanent settlement, where he lived for at least twenty years. He set up a trading post on the Chicago River, where it meets Lake Michigan, and became a wealthy man with a reputation as a man of good character and "sound business acumen."

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Black History Facts

In 1897, Andrew Jackson Beard invented the Jenny Coupler, a device linking train cars together through a bumping process. The Coupler was a boon to the welfare of many railroad workers, who originally had the dangerous job of hooking moving cars together by hand.

Black Americans have been making contributions to America from the start, but like countless other Americans whose achievements have altered and enriched our lives, these Black Americans remain unknown. It's important, though, to point out their contributions because too often people don't realize that Black Americans have been making contributions to our country from its inception. In many cases, what they accomplished they managed to do against all odds, in spite of overwhelming obstacles. These people are an inspiration to everyone who finds him or herself in circumstances that seem impossible to overcome.


Saturday, February 1, 2014

Linda's Write Spot: A Little Humor

Linda's Write Spot: A Little Humor: Just a little humor to lighten your day. Lots of you may have read this at some time but it's cute and I'm sharing it.   ...

A Little Humor

Just a little humor to lighten your day. Lots of you may have read this at some time but it's cute and I'm sharing it.

 
"RETARDED" GRANDPARENTS
 
 
Written by a  third grader , on what his grandparents do.
 
After Christmas , a teacher asked her young pupils how they spent their holiday away from school. One child wrote the following:
 
We always used to spend the holidays with Grandma and Grandpa. They used to live in a big brick house , but Grandpa got retarded and they moved to Florida . Now they live in a tin box that has wheels, but its strapped to the ground. They ride around on their bicycles , and wear name tags , because they don't know who they are anymore.
 
They go to a building called a wreck center, but they must have got it fixed because it is all okay now, they do exercises there , but they don't do them very well. There is a swimming pool too, but they all just jump up and down in it with hats on. At their gate, there is a doll house with a little old man sitting in it. He watches all day so nobody can escape.
 
Sometimes they sneak out, and go cruising in their golf carts. Nobody there cooks, they just eat out. And, they eat the same thing every night - early birds. Some of the people can't get out past the man in the doll house. The ones who do get out, bring food back to the wrecked center for pot luck.
 
My Grandma says that Grandpa worked all his life to earn his retardment and , says I should work hard so I can be retarded someday too. When I earn my retardment, I want to be the man in the doll house. Then I will let people out, so they can visit their grandchildren.
 
PRICELESS